Search
What are you looking for?
Start main content

Press Releases

Press Releases

https://www.med.cuhk.edu.hk/press-releases/cuhk-introduces-nasal-strip-sampling-for-covid-19-test-as-a-superior-tool-for-surveillance-in-a-wide-age-range-population
https://www.med.cuhk.edu.hk/press-releases/cuhk-introduces-nasal-strip-sampling-for-covid-19-test-as-a-superior-tool-for-surveillance-in-a-wide-age-range-population

CUHK Introduces Nasal Strip Sampling for COVID-19 Test As a Superior Tool for Surveillance in a Wide Age-Range Population

Covid-19 nasal strip test

CU Medicine has recently introduced a novel nasal strip test as a sensitive and accurate method to detect SARS-CoV-2. It could be a superior tool for community based surveillance test since it is a simple, less irritative and low risk method which is easy to administer in subjects of a wide age range.

 

From left: Dr. Renee CHAN, Assistant Professor; Prof. Simon LAM, Professor; Prof. Albert LI, Chairman; and Dr. Kate CHAN, Assistant Professor, of the Department of Paediatrics at CU Medicine.

A research team from the Faculty of Medicine at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CU Medicine) has recently introduced the nasal strip test as a novel and sensitive method to detect SARS-CoV-2. The team recruited approximately 40 hospitalised COVID-19 patients, aged 6 to 74, and obtained their nasal epithelial lining fluid by nasal strip. The samples were then compared against standard sampling methods including pooled nasopharyngeal and throat swabs or deep throat saliva.

 

Results showed that accuracy of nasal strip test for SARS-CoV-2 is comparable to standard tests and even out-performed saliva specimens, especially in paediatric subjects. Specimens collected by nasal strip are also stable at room temperature for 72 hours. These results suggest that the nasal strip is a superior tool for community-based surveillance testing since it is a low-risk method which can be easy to administer in subjects of a wide age-range. Study details have been published in the Journal of Infection.  

 

Standard methods pose disease transmission risk or inconsistency in sample quality

 

COVID-19 has caused over 7,000 laboratory confirmed cases in Hong Kong. Collecting nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal specimens by swabs for detection of this novel coronavirus is one of the standard methods. However, not only does this require trained-personnel to perform, the process can easily trigger sneezing, and coughing, which can pose a risk of disease transmission to surrounding people.

 

The deep throat saliva test is another option for sampling. Although this method can be self-administered by the users, it did not translate well to all individuals in the community setting. Dr. Kate Ching Ching CHAN, Assistant Professor of the Department of Paediatrics at CU Medicine, explained, “Young children and the elderly are less able to provide deep throat saliva samples as the collection technique is particularly difficult for them. This difficulty results in a high variability of sample quality which in turn reduces test sensitivity. This is not ideal for community surveillance.” 

 

In view of this, the Department of Paediatrics at CU Medicine introduced the nasal strip as a novel collection method and assessed its application in both paediatric and adult subjects. 38 asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects from the Prince of Wales Hospital were recruited, among which there were 20 infected adults (22 to 74 years old) and 18 infected children/adolescents (6 to 17 years old).

 

Accuracy of nasal strip test was comparable to standard tests and out-performed saliva specimen in paediatric subjects

 

Nasal epithelial lining fluid of the subjects was collected by nasal strips, which were prepared and cut into a designated size by the research team. The specimens were then compared against pooled nasopharyngeal and throat swabs or deep throat saliva collected from the same subject group within 24 hours after the nasal strip test. 13 paired nasal swabs were also collected by a healthcare worker right before the collection of the nasal strips to evaluate their detection performance. All samples were subjected to viral RNA quantitation by real-time PCR. 

 

nasal strip test

The nasal strips used in the study conducted by CU Medicine are customized in different sizes to fit for children at different ages to detect SARS-CoV-2.

Results are listed as below:

 

  • Compared with nasopharyngeal and throat swabs, nasal strip sampling achieved a result agreement of 95.2%. This shows the 2 sampling methods share similar accuracy.    
  • The result agreement of nasal strip sampling reduced to 68.2% when compared with deep throat saliva. However, nasal strip out-performed deep throat saliva in 6 occasions out of the 7 discrepant samples identified, where negative result was reported in the latter. Four of these deep throat saliva specimens were collected from paediatric patients.
  • There were no significant differences detected between cycle threshold (Ct) values of the paired samples of nasal strip and nasal swab, which reflects that the amount of virus detected through the two sampling methods is similar.
  • Nasal strip pairs were collected from 6 patients to determine viral stability over time and viral RNA remained detectable after storage at room temperature for 72 hours.

Short video demonstrating the procedures of the nasal strip test by a healthy volunteer. (in English)

 

First author of the study, Dr. Renee Wan Yi CHAN, Assistant Professor of the Department of Paediatrics at CU Medicine, stated, “The performance of the nasal strip is likely the result of steady nasal epithelial lining fluid absorption into the strip which is in close contact with the nasal mucosa. This reduces sample variability. Our results suggest that the nasal strip test would be superior to the deep throat saliva test for surveillance purposes over paediatric and elderly populations as the latter shows reduced sensitivity in these populations.”

 

The nasal strip test is also a less uncomfortable collection method with lower risk than nasopharyngeal and throat swabs as it is less traumatic and irritating. The application of the nasal strip reduces the possibility of any sneezes and coughs and therefore lessens the risk of virus transmission.

 

Professor Hugh Simon Hung San LAM, Professor of the Department of Paediatrics at CU Medicine, concluded, “In addition to its accuracy and lower risk of virus transmission, the stability of nasal strip samples at room temperature potentially allows the specimens to be posted to the laboratory which usually takes at least a day. All of these suggest that nasal strip testing can serve an important role in community-based surveillance programmes especially in populations such as young children and elderly adults where standard methods are more likely to fail.”

 

Study details have just been published in the Journal of Infection: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2020.11.009.

 

The length of the nasal strips (front) is significantly shorter than that of the nasopharyngeal swab collection tool (back). This helps lessen irritation and discomfort, less likely to cause sneezing and coughing, and thus greatly reduces the risk of virus transmission.

The length of the nasal strips (front) is significantly shorter than that of the nasopharyngeal swab collection tool (back). This helps lessen irritation and discomfort, less likely to cause sneezing and coughing, and thus greatly reduces the risk of virus transmission.

More Press Releases

CU Medicine Study Suggests Toddlers are at High Risk of Being  “Silent Spreaders of SARS-CoV2 Infection”

CU Medicine Study Suggests Toddlers are at High Risk of Being “Silent Spreaders of SARS-CoV2 Infection”

Research
CUHK Study Sees Shorter Sleep Put Adolescents at Risk of Future Cardiovascular Diseases

CUHK Study Sees Shorter Sleep Put Adolescents at Risk of Future Cardiovascular Diseases

Research
CUHK Recommends Oral Glucose Tolerance Test for All Pregnant Women Study Reveals Children of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Have 3-Fold Diabetes Risk

CUHK Recommends Oral Glucose Tolerance Test for All Pregnant Women Study Reveals Children of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Have 3-Fold Diabetes Risk

Research
CUHK Proves Rotavirus Vaccine Highly Effective for HK Children

CUHK Proves Rotavirus Vaccine Highly Effective for HK Children

Research
CU Medicine Study Shows Recovered Mothers Transfer COVID-19 Antibodies to Newborn Babies

CU Medicine Study Shows Recovered Mothers Transfer COVID-19 Antibodies to Newborn Babies

Research
CU Medicine Study Shows Modulation of Gut Microbiota  Helps Enhance Safety and Efficacy of COVID-19 Vaccine

CU Medicine Study Shows Modulation of Gut Microbiota Helps Enhance Safety and Efficacy of COVID-19 Vaccine

Research
CU Medicine and International Surgeons Suggest Patients with Positive COVID-19 Results Should Delay Surgery for Seven Weeks to Reduce Death Risk

CU Medicine and International Surgeons Suggest Patients with Positive COVID-19 Results Should Delay Surgery for Seven Weeks to Reduce Death Risk

International collaboration
CU Medicine Finds New Evidence for Link between Gut Microbiome and COVID-19 Severity Microbiome Imbalance Might Influence “Long COVID” Risk

CU Medicine Finds New Evidence for Link between Gut Microbiome and COVID-19 Severity Microbiome Imbalance Might Influence “Long COVID” Risk

Research
CU Medicine Survey Shows Government Recommendation as the Strongest Driver for COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance

CU Medicine Survey Shows Government Recommendation as the Strongest Driver for COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance

Research
CU Medicine Studies Suggest Grass Carp as a Major Source of Fish Allergy in Hong Kong And Identify Novel Allergenic Marker Cten i 1 to Promote Accurate Diagnosis

CU Medicine Studies Suggest Grass Carp as a Major Source of Fish Allergy in Hong Kong And Identify Novel Allergenic Marker Cten i 1 to Promote Accurate Diagnosis

Research
40% of Hong Kong People Show Gut Dysbiosis Comparable to that of COVID-19 Patients CUHK Microbiome Immunity Formula Hastens Recovery of COVID-19 Patients and Offers Hope to Boost Immunity

40% of Hong Kong People Show Gut Dysbiosis Comparable to that of COVID-19 Patients CUHK Microbiome Immunity Formula Hastens Recovery of COVID-19 Patients and Offers Hope to Boost Immunity

Research
CUHK Study Shows Exposure Settings Impact COVID-19 Transmission With Entertainment Setting Showing Propensity for Widespread Dispersion

CUHK Study Shows Exposure Settings Impact COVID-19 Transmission With Entertainment Setting Showing Propensity for Widespread Dispersion

Research
CU Medicine Found SARS-CoV2 in Infants' Stool A Coronavirus Testing Centre Is Established for Paediatric Population to Identify Silent Carriers

CU Medicine Found SARS-CoV2 in Infants' Stool A Coronavirus Testing Centre Is Established for Paediatric Population to Identify Silent Carriers

Research
Most Deaths from COVID-19 in Hong Kong are of 60 Years Old or Above CUHK Initiated International Effort in Devising Strategies to Protect Older People with Dementia amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Most Deaths from COVID-19 in Hong Kong are of 60 Years Old or Above CUHK Initiated International Effort in Devising Strategies to Protect Older People with Dementia amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Research
CU Medicine Study Shows Liver Injury is Common and Prognostic in COVID-19 Patients

CU Medicine Study Shows Liver Injury is Common and Prognostic in COVID-19 Patients

Research
CUHK Researchers Uncover Diabetes as a Potential Risk Factor for COVID-19,  and Possible Mechanisms

CUHK Researchers Uncover Diabetes as a Potential Risk Factor for COVID-19, and Possible Mechanisms

Research
CU Medicine Survey Shows Global Urological Services have been Significantly Deferred due to COVID-19 Pandemic

CU Medicine Survey Shows Global Urological Services have been Significantly Deferred due to COVID-19 Pandemic

Research
CU Medicine Develops a Probiotic Formula to Target Imbalance in Gut Microbiota in COVID-19

CU Medicine Develops a Probiotic Formula to Target Imbalance in Gut Microbiota in COVID-19

Research
CU Medicine Recruits 3,000 Persons to Investigate Hidden Infection and Break the Obstacles in Containing COVID-19 in Hong Kong

CU Medicine Recruits 3,000 Persons to Investigate Hidden Infection and Break the Obstacles in Containing COVID-19 in Hong Kong

Research
CU Medicine Offers Free Stool Screening Test for COVID-19 in Children arriving at Airport

CU Medicine Offers Free Stool Screening Test for COVID-19 in Children arriving at Airport

Clinical service
CUHK Finds that the Coronavirus Can Persist in Stool after Its Clearance in Respiratory Tract Will Conduct Stool Test for People in Quarantine Camps for Early Identification

CUHK Finds that the Coronavirus Can Persist in Stool after Its Clearance in Respiratory Tract Will Conduct Stool Test for People in Quarantine Camps for Early Identification

Research
CU Medicine Announces the Community Response Study Results During the Early Phase of the COVID-19 Outbreak in Hong Kong

CU Medicine Announces the Community Response Study Results During the Early Phase of the COVID-19 Outbreak in Hong Kong

Research
CUHK Study Sees the Exposure to Farm Environment  Is Beneficial for Children to Prevent Asthma

CUHK Study Sees the Exposure to Farm Environment Is Beneficial for Children to Prevent Asthma

Research
CUHK to Commence the Next-Generation Clinical Trials of CAR-T Cell Therapy for Haematological Malignancy

CUHK to Commence the Next-Generation Clinical Trials of CAR-T Cell Therapy for Haematological Malignancy

Research
CUHK-Designed Intervention Package Proves Effective to Increase Influenza Vaccine Uptake in Hong Kong Young Children

CUHK-Designed Intervention Package Proves Effective to Increase Influenza Vaccine Uptake in Hong Kong Young Children

Research
CUHK Establishes Hong Kong Hub of Paediatric Excellence (HK HOPE) Multidisciplinary Efforts Across the Globe to Advance Children’s Health and Well-being

CUHK Establishes Hong Kong Hub of Paediatric Excellence (HK HOPE) Multidisciplinary Efforts Across the Globe to Advance Children’s Health and Well-being

Health Campaign
CUHK Conducts Hong Kong’s First Study on Seven Common Respiratory Viruses Revealing Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza A as Prevalent Fatal Types

CUHK Conducts Hong Kong’s First Study on Seven Common Respiratory Viruses Revealing Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza A as Prevalent Fatal Types

Research
CUHK Launches Newborn Add-on Test for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Supported by Joshua Hellmann Foundation for Orphan Disease

CUHK Launches Newborn Add-on Test for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Supported by Joshua Hellmann Foundation for Orphan Disease

Donation

Our Expert List

Many experts under the Faculty of Medicine are available for media interview.
Please click here for the expert list or contact us.